Embracing the Monster…Energy Drinks

monsterenergy-cans

By: A’Laya Burroughs

Some people think that drinking energy drinks can help them recharge their batteries, but in reality energy drinks do more harm than good. Energy drinks are bad for consumers because the drinks contain a large amount of sugar and caffeine. There are all types of energy drinks; the market has Monster, Rockstar, Full Throttle energy drinks.These drinks contain the caffeine equivalent of one to three cups of coffee or cans of soda, as well as, other ingredients like ginseng.  The ginseng in these drinks is aimed at boosting energy levels. Energy drinks can cause health problems. In a podcast, Dr. Robin Toblin discussed the dangers associated with excessive consumption of energy drinks. When used in excess, energy drinks are associated with negative side effects, including sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and impaired performance of daily activities. Energy drinks contain 74mg of caffeine, 7mg of potassium, 29g of sugar and the numbers are even greater when the consumer drinks more than one drink.

Men drink energy drinks more frequently than women in order to keep themselves up and running. Mr. Reese, a history teacher at Conway High School, is a chronic energy drink drinker. “I like Monster. I know they’re not good for me, but sometimes, in the afternoon, you just need a jolt of energy, and that’s when I drink one. I have one a day, and my students often say “Hey, you shouldn’t drink that,” but [Monster] helps give me the energy I need.” Another frequent energy drinker at Conway High states, “Energy drinks are just there to help me get through the days that I’m exhausted or have to work a ridiculously long shift.” Energy drinks can be beneficial in the short term, but in the long term it could be killing you.

 

Sources consulted:

http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/caffeine-and-alcohol.htm

http://www2c.cdc.gov/podcasts/player.asp?f=8626331

 

image credit: www.beginningandend.com